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The Room

The heart of the structure is The Room which, like a treasure chest, houses the musicians in a sublime lieu that, above all, possesses peerless acoustics. Our intent is that this rich, opulent acoustic be conducive to a supernatural musical experience and that musicians, Actors themselves, find that it naturally enhances creative inspiration. In turn, The flying Musick Room will be endowing the world with an aural gift of beauty.

It is a 9,80m square room, lined with engraved wood panelling inspired by the sculptural work of Grinling Gibbons. This treatment of the wood adheres to acoustic principles. It is surmounted by a 9m high wood-panelled dome, which is supported by visible arches as designed by Philibert Delorme. Its oculus serves as a source of natural light.

Twelve arches connect the Room to the twelve Galleries. A set of removable openwork screens offer the possibility of creating a subtle visual separation between the Room and the Auditors. Rectangular openings are cut out above each arch, allowing sound to resonate throughout the Surrounding HallwayThe Room is accessible from the same Surrounding Hallway through four monumental doors located at the corners.
On the floor we can distinguish two patterns: the richest one of the two lies within the original dimensions of Mace's drawing, while the other extends itself along the length of the Surrounding Hallway. At the centre of the Room, the crossroads of all energies, is Mace's Table Organ. Depending on the requirements of the performance, it can be hidden through a hatch in the floor. It is appropriately placed in its terrestrial location par excellence, one which corresponds perfectly with the traditions of placements in sacred venues.